Look Back On: Drowning

I know it seems a morbid subject, but ever since I found myself sitting on Tasmania’s memorial to the drowned (Tamanian Sefarer’s Memorial in Triabunna on Tasmania’s East Coast) a few years ago, I have thought a lot about the poor souls who have succumbed to the trap of water. Somehow – especially given my home is by a river on the coast of an island off the south coast […]

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My Home Paddock – A Lovesong

  You’re my home paddock, My mug of soup, You’re my warm jamies, My rain on the roof. You’re when an ice cream head ache begins to ease, When you make it to the loo in time to do wees. You’re my silky knickers, My new magazine, You’re my Sunday morning, My perfect fit jeans. I really like sunshine, that first scent of spring, But you are all seasons my […]

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Catch up on: NEWS INTERNATIONAL PHONE HACKING SCANDAL

Well the Brits are probably tired of this smeary old news story in the glowy light of their golden Olympics (that sounds bitter, it’s not I promise), but I have to say that this is one I’m enjoying. ‘Media’ and ‘phone hacking’ and ‘scandal’ ought to belong together in a sentence; it’s about time something rumpled the dicky ways of the tabloid media. And this has been more than a […]

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Pondering on: COCKED UP PERSPECTIVE

Since I wrote my self-indulgent grumbly piece on Pre-menstrual tension, a question has been uncomfortably niggling at me: If I didn’t have things so good, if life bumped me about and smacked me in the face a bit more instead of cushioning me so comfortably, would things like PMS even register on my stress scale? If I was raising my family in war torn Darfur where I’d been recently raped […]

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THE VIETNAM WAR – A Different Conclusion from a Brilliant Mind (and a bit of a tribute really)

On Monday I went to the funeral of my great uncle, my grandfather’s brother and the last surviving Warner of his generation. His name was Denis Warner and he was something of a journalistic legend. He was awarded both an OBE and CMG (order of St Michael and St George) for his contribution to journalism. He lived and worked extensively throughout Asia and Australia, for many years as a war […]

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Whisper

A pounding in my chest threatens the blessed quiet of the library. A pile of books – with their unfolded story – threatens the quiet of my life.  My face is the whisper of someone, I was told long ago. Ah, so it is. It could well be the shouts and wails, gossips or exclamations of everyone else.  I close a last book. Enough now; I get the picture. It’s […]

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Catch up On: THE ASYLUM SEEKER TRAGEDY

Julia Gillard’s Malaysia solution bill was passed in the lower house yesterday and is the subject of a highly emotional debate in the upper house of parliament today. This in response to  the death of 94 boat people on their way from Indonesia to Australia in the last week. I have written a full background to this previously so you can get the dummies guide here, but I have a […]

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A LETTER TO NAN CHAUNCY (Catch up on Indigenous reconciliation)

A note about Nan Chauncy: she was a Tasmanian author who wrote classics like “The Found a Cave”, “Devil’s Hill” and my favourite, “Tangara” – the story of Lexie, a white Australian who befriended an Aboriginal girl, Merinna. It was one of many Nan Chauncy publications that addressed Aboriginal issues. Nan Chauncy lived on a property named Chauncy Vale, near Baghdad, north of Hobart. She died in 1970.  Warning: The links […]

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EAT YOUR DINNER

I think I’m going to shout again, Or maybe I will cry, While three annoying little shits, Refuse to eat their pie. I haven’t  baked in any carrot, Or sneaky peas or beans, Forget the goodness, just fill up, Or else I’ll have to scream. No don’t just eat the pastry bits, You have to have some meat, Come on you bogans have a bite, And you might get a […]

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